Project Lawsuit Abuse:
Stories from the Frontlines of Lawsuit Abuse

Justice comes to those who scam

All too often, personal injury lawyers abuse our courts for a profit, filing abusive and wasteful lawsuits at the expense of consumers. Sometimes, they even commit outright fraud, violating laws in order to get rich.

That’s exactly what personal injury lawyers Robert Peirce and Louis Raimond did when they conspired with a radiologist to fabricate asbestos claims, having him fake diagnoses so they could clog up West Virginia’s courts with meritless lawsuits.    

Baby Steps to Prop.65 Reform

Editor's Note: Project Lawsuit Abuse regularly highlights lawsuit abuse news from across the country. Today, Tom Scott, Executive Director of California Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse, contributed a guest post for Project Lawsuit Abuse.

On September 11th, the California state Senate sent AB 227 by Assemblyman Mike Gatto with a vote of 78-0, and the bill is now on its way to Governor Brown for a veto or signature. Gov. Brown likely will sign it because it has received bipartisan support from a broad coalition of trial lawyers, environmentalists and business. 

Project Lawsuit Abuse Newsmakers

Tort reformers have been turning up all over the internet recently. We took the liberty of rounding up some of the standouts. You may recognize a few friends of Project Lawsuit Abuse in there. Here are some of the newsmakers from around the country.

Frivolous lawsuits the basis for new law

Did "Mind Control" Tell Him to File This Lawsuit?

Our civil justice system is intended for justice, not greed. But too often, people abuse the system in attempts to play the lawsuit lottery and get rich, and inmates are often among the worst offenders.  For example, a U.S. judge recently dismissed a $650 million lawsuit filed by a prisoner in Pittsburgh, Frederick Banks, who claims the federal government has been using "voice-to-skull" electronic devices to manipulate his mind.

Slip, Fall...Get Rich?

The slip and fall lawsuit is something that all small business owners fear. While some are legitimate, many others are not. Take, for instance, the story of a woman in Illinois who claimed she fell in water on the floor of a small grocery store. Later, security footage showed that she actually dragged her foot through the water to make it look like she slipped – can you believe that? 

This Nutella Lawsuit Is Nuts!

It seems like lawsuits can be filed for almost anything these days, including people’s inability to read nutrition labels. Take the case of a San Diego mother, who claimed that commercials duped her into thinking that Nutella, a chocolate-based spread, was a healthy breakfast for her daughter. But, imagine her dismay when she actually read the label and saw that the spread has 21 grams of sugar and 200 calories per serving. 

Project Lawsuit Abuse Newsmakers

Tort reformers have been turning up all over the internet recently. We took the liberty of rounding up some of the standouts. You may recognize a few friends of Project Lawsuit Abuse in there. Here are some of the newsmakers from around the country.

Our litigious society finds a new low

Editor's Note: Project Lawsuit Abuse regularly highlights lawsuit abuse news from across the country. Today, Travis Akin, Executive Director of Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch, contributed a guest post for Project Lawsuit Abuse.

While former NFL offensive lineman Brian Holloway was at his Florida home, hundreds of teens were gathering at his other house in New York.

At first Holloway thought the pictures on Twitter he saw of teens partying at his house were a joke but the tweets kept coming and he saw kids dancing on a table he bought with his Super Bowl winnings and he soon realized that it was no joke. Teens had broken into his house and were trashing the place. 

Use Common Sense, Don’t Sue!

Just when we think we’ve heard it all, we get word of another ridiculous lawsuit. This one’s out of Illinois, where a man was injured while riding as a passenger with a drunk driver. The driver, Nikolas Becoat, had consumed alcohol purchased at Shop N’ Save, a grocery store, shortly before getting in the accident. 

The logical conclusion would be that the injured man, Jalen Smith, made a poor decision in deciding to be a passenger in a car driven by an intoxicated man. And, while it’s terribly unfortunate that he became injured, he should take personal responsibility for his injuries. 

Missouri Legislature Takes on Personal Injury Lawyers

Last week, Missouri Governor Jay Nixon, egged on by politically influential personal injury lawyers who have donated to his campaign, vetoed a number of important legal reform bills passed by the state legislature. But thankfully, lawmakers pulled together enough votes to override his vetoes and pass the reforms.