Project Lawsuit Abuse:
Stories from the Frontlines of Lawsuit Abuse

Project Lawsuit Abuse Newsmakers

Tort reformers have been turning up all over the internet recently. We took the liberty of rounding up some of the standouts. You may recognize a few friends of Project Lawsuit Abuse in there. Here are some of the newsmakers from around the country.

WV CALA releases ‘Dirty Dozen’ list, candidates funded by trial lawyers
A West Virginia legal reform group has released its “Dirty Dozen” list highlighting candidates funded in part by trial lawyers. - Legal Newsline

Illinois a leader in employment litigation

Editor's Note: Project Lawsuit Abuse regularly highlights lawsuit abuse news from across the country. Today, Travis Akin, Executive Director of Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch, contributed a guest post for Project Lawsuit Abuse.

A new study by Hiscox examines the average rate US-based companies are sued by employees. According to the survey, on average a United States-based business with at least 10 employees has a 12.5% chance of being sued by an employee.

Project Lawsuit Abuse Newsmakers

Tort reformers have been turning up all over the internet recently. We took the liberty of rounding up some of the standouts. You may recognize a few friends of Project Lawsuit Abuse in there. Here are some of the newsmakers from around the country.

How Much Are You Paying to Personal Injury Lawyers Each Year?

Last week was tax day, which we all know means that it’s time for us to all fork over our share to Uncle Sam. But what you may not know is that on top of the taxes that we pay to the government, we’re all paying an additional hidden tax – the “lawsuit tax.” 

No matter where you live, excessive lawsuits drive up costs for consumers. More litigation equals fewer jobs, more expensive products and decreased innovation. In fact, each of us pays around $857 a year in lawsuit taxes! That means a family of four pays a lawsuit tax of at least $3,500 a year. 

Project Lawsuit Abuse Newsmakers

Tort reformers have been turning up all over the internet recently. We took the liberty of rounding up some of the standouts. You may recognize a few friends of Project Lawsuit Abuse in there. Here are some of the newsmakers from around the country.

Too many ridiculous lawsuits
Who can forget the infamous McDonald's coffee lawsuit where trial lawyers took advantage of the court system for a big pay day? I'm reminded of it every day when I read about ridiculous lawsuits in the news. - The Sun Sentinel

This Lawsuit Is Bananas…Literally!

You’ve probably heard of a lawsuit where someone sued over slipping on a banana peel (or “slipping” as happened in this fraudulent case), but have you heard of a lawsuit over a banana costume?

More lawsuits or a fair shot to offer a fair settlement?

Should an insurer be given a fair chance to settle a claim before being sued?   It seems like a rational concept, but that’s not what is happening in Florida. 

Lawsuit Lending Lunacy

Editor's Note: Project Lawsuit Abuse regularly highlights lawsuit abuse news from across the country. Today, Travis Akin, Executive Director of Illinois Lawsuit Abuse Watch, contributed a guest post for Project Lawsuit Abuse.

The “lawsuit loan sharks” have taken a bite out of another victim.

Chicagoan Debbie Crim injured her spine, neck, shoulders and arms in 2001 when a Metra train she was riding on hit a car at a Chicago railroad crossing.

When Constituents and Small Business Owners Speak, Legislators Listen

Editor's Note: Project Lawsuit Abuse regularly highlights lawsuit abuse news from across the country. Today, Tom Scott, Executive Director of California Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse, contributed a guest post for Project Lawsuit Abuse.

West Virginians Want Jobs, Not Lawsuits

If you’re a faithful reader of our blog, we don’t have to tell you twice: abusive lawsuits hurt our economy. And West Virginians should know that fact as well as anyone else, from first-hand experience. West Virginia’s legal climate is clearly out-of-step with the rest of the country, with the state consistently earning a spot as a top Judicial Hellhole.

West Virginia’s economy reflects its poor legal climate. Report after report ranks the state as one of the worst places to do business, and West Virginians have long felt the financial impact.